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Travel Africa Issue 85 – Winter 2018/19

  • In this issue
  • Africa’s changing cultural landscape
  • Safaris for body and soul
  • Where next? Our top spots
  • Nature’s Best Photography
  • Travelling with teenagers
  • Skeleton Coast lions
  • Jackals… and so much more
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Features

Africa’s changing cultural landscape
An 18-page report looking at how modernisation is affecting Africa’s rich cultural heritage. Inspired by the release of Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher’s new book, African Twilight, we have expanded the discussion to explore the various perspectives on African culture:

African twilight
Exclusively for Travel Africa, Brian Jackman interviews photographers Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher to learn more about their extraordinary work recording Africa’s great cultural ceremonies, the lessons learned along the way, and their fear for Africa’s changing cultural landscape. The interview is followed by a selection of images from African Twilight, which lend some insight to the traditions recorded in their book.

The Maasai perspective
Jackson Looseyia has been involved in community conservation and tourism for 25 years. He set up the Koiyaki Guiding School, presented Big Cat Diary Live on the BBC, and now co-owns and runs Tangulia Mara Camp. As a proud Maasai with daily exposure to the modern world, we asked his thoughts on the importance of culture and the challenges being faced in the community.

The tourist’s perspective
As a traveller with an interest in learning more about African culture, how should you approach visits to villages or ceremonies? By Emma Gregg

The urban perspective
We meet seven creative millennials living in Nairobi, to see what culture means to them. Interviews by Kelai Wanjiru

Personally speaking
A rare encounter on a recent visit to a remote area of Madagascar prompted Hilary Bradt to consider her own changing attitudes to cultural tourism, reflect on the past and to question the impact we all have on other communities when we travel.

Body and soul
With an increasing number of us more conscious of our mental and physical health, we’ve put together 17 pages of suggestions for ways to make your safaris more invigorating, without breaking too much of a sweat

Where next?
The most well-known reserves are popular for a reason. But what if you’re looking for somewhere different, which still offers a rewarding safari experience yet without the crowds? We’re here to help, with our suggestions for five destinations we think deserve greater attention:
• Meru National Park, Kenya
• Principe Island, Sao Tome and Principe
• Limpopo Province, South Africa
• Liuwa Plain National Park, Zambia
• Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe

Day of the jackal
Never again ignore this busy opportunist of the bush, for its presence usually reveals something intriguing going on. A detailed look at jackal behavior and distribution, by Mike Unwin

Skeleton Coast lions
Remarkable relearned behavior shows the resilience of Namibia’s quite remarkable desert-adapted big cats. By Dr Philip Stander, who has been researching the desert lions for over 30 years

Teenage kicks
If you have children or grandchildren who are soon to fly the nest and head to university, go travelling or venture into the workplace, you might want to have one last big expedition with them beforehand. And Africa is a pretty perfect playground for such an adventure. Here’s what such a road trip might look like. William Gray writes about his self-drive journey from South Africa into Botswana

Good karma
In the heart of Lake Malawi lies a quiet island with a big history, where the trickle of tourism flows effortlessly through the fabric of society. But there’s more reasons to visit than you might think, discovers Laura Birtles

Indaba section:
A compendium of short stories giving personal insight to African travel, including:
Letter from Accra, Ghana, by Martha Mukaiwa
Impact of your travel: Tukongote Community Projects, Livingstone
Things I’ve learned about visiting Uganda over 30 years, by Philip Briggs

Conservation:
A mini-section, supported by African Wildlife Foundation, in which we look at:
The Tusk Conservation Awards
Female rangers taking charge of community conservation
How technology is helping drive conservation efforts
Dancing with the scars: how and why wildlife puts on a show

Safari section:
News and advice to help you plan a trip. Content includes:
What is it really like to sleep in a skybed?
Lodge review: Verneys Camp, Hwange National Park
News on lodge openings and fresh travel ideas
What the travel trade will focus on in 2019

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